and Arthritis Control
for Your Pet

Pain management is not an option –– it’s an imperative. It can be one of the most complex aspects of being the caregiver of a sick animal. Animals have a natural instinct to hide pain, so signs of pain may be very difficult to detect and may include symptoms such as turning away a treat, slowly eating their food or sleeping loss. In cases of severe pain, your pet may show unusual aggressiveness, such as barking, snarling and snapping.

FACTORS

That Can Cause Pain in Pets

Pain can be caused by many things in pets including:
According to Best Friends Veterinary Hospital, your pet’s pain often falls into two categories: acute and chronic. Acute pain is almost always due to trauma, injury, or post-surgery. Our staff can offer short-term treatment, issuing higher doses of pain medication to ensure your pet’s comfort. Chronic pain is typically due to joint disease or displacement, arthritis, chronic skin conditions and chronic internal issues. Our staff uses low-dosage pain medications, laser therapy, and dietary guidance to ensure a smoother healing process for your pet. Every patient that undergoes a procedure requiring sedation or general anesthesia is provided with pain control/medication before being sent home. Our doctors and staff take all necessary steps to relieve any pain before, during and after your pet’s surgical procedure, because with proper pain control for all surgeries, the less time it takes your pet to heal.

Managing Arthritis in Older Pets

At Best Friends Veterinary Hospital, we recognize that our pets might develop chronic pain conditions as they age. Arthritis is an inflammatory condition prevalent in older pets which can negatively impact their quality of life.

Types of Arthritis:

Many options are available to treat arthritis, targeted to the specific type and cause of the condition. Surgery might be needed in cases where a joint must be stabilized. DJD can be treated with NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), pain medication such as Tramadol, cartilage protective agents such as glucosamine or Adequan, acupuncture, or steroids, as a last resort. (It should be noted that at Best Friends Veterinary Hospital, we use NSAIDs developed specifically for pets, not those made for humans, as those are likely to cause ulcers in dogs, while most NSAIDs cannot be used for cats.)

If you feel your pet might benefit from a consultation about acute or chronic pain,

please call our caring staff at
Best Friends Veterinary Hospital
Crossville Office: 931-459-2006
Cookeville Office: 931-881-2037